Colonial Honduras.

The defeat of Lempira’s revolt, the establishment of the bishopric (first at Trujillo, then at Comayagua after Bishop Pedraza’s death), and the decline in fighting amongst rival Spanish factions all contributed to expanded settlement and increased economic activity in the 1540s. A variety of agricultural activities was developed, including cattle ranching and, for a time,Continue reading “Colonial Honduras.”

The Spanish Conquest.

European contact with the indigenous population of Honduras began during the final voyage of Christopher Columbus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Columbus. In the year 1502 Columbus sailed past the Islas de la Bahía (Bay Islands) and shortly thereafter reached the mainland of Central America. Whilst upon one of the islands, Columbus seized a large canoe loaded with a wideContinue reading “The Spanish Conquest.”

Pre-Columbian Honduras.

*Pre-Columbian definition: “relating to the history and cultures of the Americas before the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492.” Mayan Heritage. Pre-Columbian Honduras was populated by a complex mixture of indigenous peoples who stemmed from a wide variety of cultural backgrounds and linguistic chapters. The most advanced and notable of these were related to theContinue reading “Pre-Columbian Honduras.”

Sealife of Honduras.

More than 220 different species have been recorded in Honduran waters and those around the Bay Islands, which form a part of the most extensive barrier reef within the entire northern hemisphere. The species found include whale sharks, hawksbill turtles, dolphins, West Indian Manatee, spotted eagle ray and yellow stingray. Other peculiar and rare creaturesContinue reading “Sealife of Honduras.”

Animals of Honduras

The following gallery shall provide a glimpse of some of the most prized and celebrated wildlife encountered within the nation of Honduras. The flora and fauna of Honduras represents the country’s geographical position, for this a nation submerged in the heart of the tropics. Diverse species of plants and animals have adapted here yet tragically, someContinue reading “Animals of Honduras”

Tegucigalpa's Hill Towns.

Within the heavily forested outskirts of the Honduran capital Tegucigalpa, nestled high up in the hills, there lie three wonderfully quaint and traditional towns, which are Valle De Angeles, Santa Lucia and Ojojona. I can only but thoroughly recommend a visit to all three of these communities. Valle De Angeles. This gorgeous colonial town wasContinue reading “Tegucigalpa's Hill Towns.”

Amapala, The Pacific Beauty.

A searing, dry heat pierced through one’s skin, as my capitalino friends and I touched dark, volcanic sands after having stumbled upon a most cozy, little beachside restaurant rested between an inlet and some forested hills. We desired a traditional maritime lunch, perhaps some fried fish, shrimps and such. Local beers, did not go amissContinue reading “Amapala, The Pacific Beauty.”

The Great Writer.

Ramon Amaya Amador, was born in Olanchito in the department of Yoro. After being educated in La Ceiba, he laboured on the banana plantations of the northern Caribbean coast of Honduras. He published his first work in the year 1939. Amaya became a journalist in 1941 for El Atlántico (The Atlantic), a La Ceiba newspaper. In October 1943 he founded a weekly magazine in Olanchito called Alerta (Alert).Continue reading “The Great Writer.”